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Police arrest two after Clark protesters shot

MINNEAPOLIS — Police arrested two of three men sought in connection with Monday night shootings at a protest of Jamar Clark’s shooting.

Late Tuesday morning, a 23-year-old white man was arrested and early in the afternoon Minneapolis police reported they caught a 32-year-old Hispanic man.

The first man was arrested at 11:20 a.m. in Bloomington. The second arrest came at 12:05 p.m. in south Minneapolis.

Police said little else about the arrests.

In the meantime, Clark’s family says the Monday night shootings, which injured five demonstrators, mean it is time to end a protest that has gone on since a Minneapolis police officer fatally shot the black man early Nov. 15.

Clark’s brother, Eddie Sutton, released a statement after protesters were shot late Monday.

“We appreciate Black Lives Matter for holding it down and keeping the protests peaceful,” Sutton said in a statement released by U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison’s office following the shootings near the 4th Precinct.

“But in light of tonight’s shootings, the family feels out of imminent concern for the safety of the occupiers, we must get the occupation of the 4th Precinct ended and onto the next step.”

Sutton thanked the community for “incredible support” since the 24-year-old died from a single bullet to the head.

Police said injuries of those shot Monday did not appear to be life-threatening.

The search continues for one more shooting suspect, police said.

Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges released a statement that said she “abhors last night’s attacks.”

“We are sparing no efforts to find the suspects and bring them to justice,” Hodges said.

Protesters at the encampment called the shooters white supremacists.

FBI spokesman Kyle Loven said Tuesday that the FBI was “aware of last night’s incident and is coordinating with the Minneapolis police to assess the situation and determine whether federal action is appropriate.”

He declined to say whether the FBI was investigating the shooting as a possible hate crime.

Protesters say they asked the men to leave, but the three later came back and fired six shots into the crowd.

“Dozens of officers responded almost immediately, attending to victims and secured the scene,” Minneapolis police reported. “Additional resources were called in and are actively investigating the shootings, interviewing a multitude of witnesses.”

Three of the victims went to North Memorial Medical Center by private vehicle, two were taken to Hennepin County Medical Center by ambulance.

The shooting occurred at 10:45 p.m. Monday.

Twin Cities media reported that Black Lives Matter Minneapolis spokeswoman Niski Noor said the group of white supremacists has been at the protest other nights since the fatal shooting Nov. 15.

A witness said one man wore a mask.

On its Facebook page, Black Lives Matter Minneapolis called the shootings an act of “domestic terrorism.”

“We will not be intimidated,” the page read. “Stand with us tomorrow.”

The organization planned a march at 2 p.m. today beginning at the 4th Precinct.

While Black Lives Matter Minneapolis had hinted that it could end its precinct occupation today, it put out a call for supplies on Facebook:

“Family! We need warm food, gloves/hats, chairs, firewood, and snacks!! We are very low on supplies. Please bring down ASAP. We will not be intimidated.”

On Monday, Gov. Mark Dayton said he had watched one of the videos shot at the scene of Clark’s shooting. He said the video, taken from an ambulance camera, was inconclusive and would not prove whether Clark was handcuffed.

Some witnesses of the incident said Clark was cuffed, but police have said he was not. Police say Clark was in the process of getting control of one of an officer’s gun when he was shot once in the head. He died the next day.

Reuters news service contributed to this story.

Don Davis
Don Davis has been the Forum Communications Minnesota Capitol Bureau chief since 2001, covering state government and politics for two dozen newspapers in the state. Don also blogs at Capital Chatter on Areavoices.
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