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Minnesota Department of Natural Resources East Metro Area Fisheries Manager Jerry Johnson releases rainbow trout into Pottery Pond.

Pottery Pond gets 300 new scaly residents

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About 300 scaly creatures can now call Red Wing home. That is, until they end up on the end of someone's fishing line.

Two men from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources restocked Pottery Pond Thursday morning with a fresh supply of rainbow trout.

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"We like to provide the opportunity," for people who wouldn't normally get a chance to catch trout -- such as the elderly or disabled -- to do so, DNR Fisheries Supervisor Steve Klotz said. Pottery Pond provides handicap access to its banks.

The small body of water just behind Pottery Place is restocked with fresh trout about five times a year, DNR East Metro Area Fisheries Manager Jerry Johnson added. The pond needs to be continually restocked because the trout don't breed in its calm waters.

"They need constant moving water," Johnson said, such as a stream.

Rainbow trout is the DNR's go-to fish for Pottery Pond, Johnson said.

"Rainbows are easier to catch than brown trout," he added.

The new fish are about 2 years old and each weighs about a pound. They were hatched at the Lanesboro State Fish Hatchery, which breeds most of the fish the DNR uses to stock ponds throughout the state.

The creatures traveled from their birthplace in a specialized fish transportation container loaded in the back of a pickup. The container is insulated, oxygenated and agitates the water to drive off toxic gases the fish produce during transport.

Johnson and Klotz used a net to move the fish from the container into the pond water.

The new trout were ready to be fished as soon as they hit the water Thursday morning, Johnson said.

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Sarah Gorvin
Sarah Gorvin has been with the Republican Eagle for two years and covers education, business and crime and courts. She graduated from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in 2010 with a  journalism degree.
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